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As is the case with any other medication, there may be some instances where diclofenac interactions can occur. In such cases, use is not recommended, or usage will have to be adjusted in order to prevent or reduce the risk of negative interactions occurring from other drugs, medical conditions, or even food and drink.

Drug Interactions

According to the FDA, drugs that may interact with diclofenac (Flector, Cambia, Zorvolex) include the following.

  • Aspirin
  • Methotrexate [Otrexup (PF), Xatmep, Trexall]
  • Cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf)
  • ACE inhibitors like lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril)
  • Furosemide (Lasix)
  • Lithium
  • Warfarin (Jantoven, Coumadin)

Please note that this list may not be complete, and other interactions with drugs not listed here may occur.

Tylenol (Acetaminophen)

Diclofenac and acetaminophen are sometimes combined into one treatment for musculoskeletal pain relief. Although diclofenac should not be taken with other NSAIDs like ibuprofen, it is likely safe to take with Tylenol under the guidance of a licensed medical professional. 

Lisinopril (Qbrelis)

Lisinopril is a high blood pressure medication known as an ACE inhibitor. Both lisinopril and diclofenac can lower blood pressure. Taking them together might therefore lead to extremely low blood pressure. There is also an indication that the combination of medications can affect kidney function. In general lisinopril and diclofenac are a safe combination. Always follow your physicians instructions precisely.

Gabapentin

Gabapentin (Neurontin) is an anticonvulsant medication. It is not clear if there is an interaction between these two drugs. Both medications could potentially cause dizziness, though.  

Ibuprofen (Advil)

Like diclofenac, ibuprofen is an NSAID. Patients should not take two NSAIDs together. Doing so may increase the risk of significant side effects, such as stomach upset and bleeding. 

Adderall

It is not clear if there are interactions between Adderall, a medication for the treatment of ADHD, and diclofenac. It is always wise to talk to a medical provider before combining medications, though. 

Misoprostol (Cytotec)

Misoprostol is a medication that protects the stomach, and it is sometimes combined with diclofenac in people at risk for ulcers. 

Aspirin

Aspirin, like diclofenac, is an NSAID. Patients should not take two NSAIDs together. Doing so may increase the risk of significant side effects, such as stomach upset and bleeding. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: In some cases physicians will instruct patients to take 81 mg Aspirin in those cases aspirin and diclofenac are safe. Doses > 81 mg of Aspirin may not be safe.

Aleve (Naproxen Sodium)

Naproxen sodium is an NSAID like diclofenac. Patients should not take two NSAIDs together. Doing so may increase the risk of significant side effects, such as stomach upset and bleeding. 

Cyclobenzaprine (Fexmid)

Cyclobenzaprine is a drug used to treat muscle spasms. It is not clear if there is an interaction between these two drugs. Both medications could potentially cause dizziness, though.  

Prednisone (Rayos)

Prednisone can treat inflammation in people with asthma, COPD, or rheumatologic diseases. Taking it with diclofenac can increase the risk of gastrointestinal tract side effects like ulcers.  

IMPORTANTE NOTE: Always follow your physicians instructions. Discuss with your physician before taking diclofenac and steroids together.

Food Interactions

Sometimes the foods we eat and the beverages we drink can also interact with our medications. Food and drink that may interact with this drug include:

  • Alcohol

Please note that this list may not be complete, and there may be other foods and beverages that interact with this drug.

Diclofenac and Alcohol

For more information, please visit our page on diclofenac and alcohol interactions.

Disease & Conditions Interactions

Sometimes certain medications can increase the risk of negative side effects for patients with certain diseases or other medical conditions. According to the FDA, diseases, and medical conditions that are known to negatively interact with diclofenac include:

Please note that this list may not be complete, and there may be other diseases and medical conditions where patients should not take this medication.

Diclofenac and Pregnancy

For more information, please visit our page on diclofenac and pregnancy risks.

Disclaimer: this article does not constitute or replace medical advice. If you have an emergency or a serious medical question, please contact a medical professional or call 911 immediately. To see our full medical disclaimer, visit our Terms of Use page.


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